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Does Olive Oil Increase Testosterone? (Science-Based)

Tyler Sellers
Published by Tyler Sellers
Fact checked by Donald Christman, BHSc FACT CHECKED

Over the past few years, I’ve come across a lot of people at my gym who take anabolic steroids to help them reach their fitness goals. The unfortunate reality is that these kinds of enhancers can cause severe side effects like liver damage or high blood pressure.

That said, I’m always interested in finding new alternatives and natural methods for boosting testosterone. Recently, I’ve found that olive oil may actually be a good source of nutrients that can ignite T production.

So, I’ve spent the last five weeks conducting thorough research to gain a deeper insight into this matter.

Here’s what I found out.

Quick Summary

  • Olive oil contains monounsaturated fatty acids, which may impact your testosterone level.
  • Studies have shown that extra virgin olive oil increases luteinizing hormone (LH) production, which causes the testes to produce more testosterone.
  • Olive oil overconsumption can cause low blood pressure, weight gain, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Does Olive Oil Consumption Boost Testosterone Levels?

A person pouring down olive oil

Yes, olive oil consumption improves testosterone levels.

Diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids, found in virgin oil, and other foods high in healthy fats like coconut oil, avocados, and nuts have been shown to boost androgens among healthy adult men.

In fact, low-fat diets appear to have a direct correlation with low testosterone levels in men.

A study that involved 206 male volunteers discovered that their testosterone levels fell by 10–15% when they switched from a high-fat diet to a low-fat diet [1].

The same source found that a high intake of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) can improve male reproductive health [2].

In the same line, other research showed that oleuropein, a key compound found in olives and EVOO, can trigger increased testosterone production by 17.4% and luteinizing hormone by 42.6% [3].

However, further research is necessary to support this.

In addition, high oxidative stress has been linked to negative testosterone effects. Olive oil contains antioxidants, which are thought to shield Leydig cells from oxidative stress-related damage [4,5].

Virgin oil is a common element in Moroccan culture for cooking and health-improving purposes.

So, a study was conducted to assess argan and olive oil benefits among healthy Moroccan men.

Researchers discovered significant increases in the hormonal profile of androgens. They found an increase in both testosterone levels and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels among healthy adult Moroccan men after consuming EVOO for three weeks [6].

How Can Extra Virgin Olive Oil Boost Testosterone Production?

Close up shot of olive oil on a table

Extra virgin olive oil can boost testosterone production by increasing the activity of two enzymes vital for testosterone creation; 3β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17-β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

These two enzymes are responsible for the conversion of cholesterol to testosterone.

By increasing their activity, more cholesterol is converted into testosterone, leading to higher levels of the hormone in the body [7,8].

Additionally, EVOO also increases the number of Leydig cells in the testes.

These cells are responsible for absorbing cholesterol and converting it into testosterone.

Therefore, by increasing the number of these cells, more cholesterol is available for conversion into testosterone, further boosting low testosterone levels.

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Are There Any Risks Associated With Using Olive Oil?

Yes, there are some risks associated with using olive oil in large doses, such as nausea, low blood pressure, headaches, and dizziness [9,10].

It is a calorie-dense food, with each tablespoon containing 120 Kcal. So people who are trying to lose weight should avoid including too much of it in their diet.

Although research has shown that the Mediterranean diet with EVOO outperforms low-fat diets for weight loss, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in virgin oil are proven to cause weight gain if used excessively [11].

It's also important to note that it is high in saturated fat, which can be bad for your heart health if eaten in large quantities.

How to Use Extra Virgin Olive Oil to Boost T Levels?

Close up shot of extra virgin olive oil being poured

To boost T levels using olive oil, simply take around 25 grams of extra virgin oil first thing in the morning or before sleep.

Consuming the recommended amount may significantly improve your sexual health, blood pressure, and mood.

With that in mind, our dietitian recommends not cooking EVOO at a temperature higher than 400 °F. This way, you can enjoy the full taste and get the maximum out of its antioxidants.

Concerning storage, it should be kept in a cold and dark place to keep its compounds intact.

It contains several chemicals that are susceptible to degradation when exposed to heat and light.

Final Thoughts

Based on all of this, I believe that olive oil does have the potential to improve mood and help with stamina due to its antioxidant properties.

However, the effects we can expect to experience are extremely subtle, which is not enough for high-intensity resistance training and significant muscle growth.

That’s why I always recommend some of the best natural testosterone boosters for both men and women clients that require that extra push during their workouts.

All of these supplements have passed through our regular testing routine, and we’ve confirmed that they do contain ingredients proven to boost T levels without inducing any adverse effects.


References:

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33741447/
  2. https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-04-fat-diets-decrease-testosterone-men.html
  3. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22901687/
  4. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213231719310754
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4576505/
  6. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23472458/
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9029730/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2259022/
  9. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1689/olive-oil
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7352724/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5452168/
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