Bill Kazmaier Workout Routine & Diet (Ultimate Formula)

Benedict Ang, CPT, PN1-NC
Published by Benedict Ang, CPT, PN1-NC | Staff Writer & Senior Coach
Last updated: June 20, 2024
FACT CHECKED by James Cunningham, BSc, CPT
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I vividly recall watching Bill Kazmaier, a true powerhouse, carving out a legacy in the 70s and 80s. His strength and determination were unmatched, making every lift and competition a spectacle of incredible athleticism.

Even after nearly 30 years since he competed professionally, Bill Kazmaier's training and workout ethics continue to inspire enthusiasts and aspiring athletes.

What secrets can we uncover about the workout routines and diet of the Iconic Bill Kazmaier?

Read on and be amazed.

The Bill Kazmeier Workout Plan And Training Routine

Bill's training methodologies weren't static; they evolved over the years, adapting to new knowledge, equipment, and his own physical development.

Following Bill's example, I learned that adaptability in training is key. My own methods have evolved, influenced by Bill's approach, embracing new techniques and equipment to match my body's changing needs.

I’ll first show you how Bill split his training routine over four training days. Then we’ll look at how this training plan shifted the weight load over a ten-week period.

Day 1

Man doing tricep curls on bench press
  • Bench Press: 1 warm-up and 4 sets of 10 reps (heavy bench press)
  • Narrow Grip Bench Press: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Wide Bench Presses: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Front Deltoid Raise: 4 sets of 8 reps
  • Seated Dumbbell Presses: 4 sets of 10 reps
  • Lying Triceps Push: 2 warm-up sets and 6 sets of 10 reps
  • Side Deltoid Raise: 4 sets of 10 reps
  • Triceps Push Down: 4 sets of 10 reps

Day 2

Man doing deadlifts
  • Squats: 1 warm-up and 4 sets of 10 reps (heavy)
  • Deadlift: 1 warm-up and 3 sets of 10 reps (light)
  • Seated Hammer Curls: 4 sets of 12 reps
  • Shrugs: 2 sets of 15-40 reps (light), 1 set of 10-20 reps (heavy)
  • Standing Curl: 4 sets of 10 reps
  • Seated Row: 4 sets of 10 reps
  • Close Grip Chin Ups: 3 sets of max reps
  • Leg Extensions: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Calf Raise: 3 sets of 15-25 reps
  • Leg Curl: 3 sets of 10 reps

Day 3

  • Bench Press: 1 warm-up set and 3 sets of 10 reps (light bench press)
  • Narrow Grip Bench Press: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Wide Grip Bench Press: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Front Deltoid Raise: 4 sets of 10 reps
  • Dumbbell Seated Press: 1 warm-up set and 4 sets of 8 reps (heavy)
  • Prone Triceps Extension: 4 sets of 10 reps
  • Tennis Backhand Cable Extensions: 4 sets of 10 reps

Related: Alternative Exercises For Bench Press

Day 4

Hand holding a dumbbell
  • Deadlift: 1 warm-up set and 4 sets of 8 reps (heavy)
  • Squat: 1warm up and 4 sets of 10 reps (light)
  • Shrugs: 4 sets of 10-15 reps (heavy)
  • Concentration Curl: 4 sets of 12 reps
  • Seated Hammer Curl: 4 sets of 8 reps
  • Wide Grip Pull: 4 sets of 10 reps
  • One Arm Row: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Leg Extensions: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Calf Raise: 3 sets of 15-25 reps
  • Leg Curl: 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Mix Of Ab Crunches

Bill Kazmaier used a 10-week plan to prepare for a competitive event that involved gradually overloading the weight for wide grip and narrow grip bench press, deadlifts, and hammer curls, among others. Bill used this routine to set a world bench press record.

In week 1, a light day would see regular bench presses with a light load going up from 225, to 315, to 410 pounds. On a heavy day, there was an extra set of 435 pounds.

The light day loads would usually stay the same as the weeks progressed. But he would gradually add more sets for the heavy days.

In week 10, that meant sets of 225, 315, 405, 495, 550, 590, and 535 pounds for his bench press and deadlifts.

That is a staggering amount, but even if you don’t get close to that, the routine shows how you could plan out your routine over several weeks.

Now let’s look at what Bill Kazmaier would eat each day.

Read more: 10 Best Powerlifting Exercises

How Did He Handle Nutrition?

High Protein meal on a plate

Drawing from Kazmaier's discipline, I too focused on nutrition as the cornerstone of my strength training. It's a practice that has fueled my endurance and powered me through the most intense workouts.

I would love to be able to give you details of what Bill Kazmaier’s meal plan looked like.

We pulled in one of our dietitians who did some estimating based on Bill’s training plan, and the numbers are quite staggering.

The dietitian’s insights unveil a daily caloric intake ranging between 5,000 and 7,000, painting a vivid picture of Kazmaier’s nutritional commitment aligned with his herculean training regimen. That’s like eating 3 breakfasts, 3 lunches, 3 dinners, plus snacks. Back in those days, there were no mass gainer supplements.

For the Bill Kazmaier training and diet, it was all about eating. Supplements were most likely out of the picture.

How Successful Was Bill Kazmeier?

There are two parts to Bill’s career, and they are equally impressive.

Powerlifting

Football was his main sport during high school and university, but he quickly realized that he was able to hit the weights a lot harder than most of his fellows.

In 1978, a pivotal moment unfolded as Kazmaier stepped into the competitive arena of the Amateur Athletic Union, marking the onset of an iconic journey.

Kazmaier, a novice in the 275-pound class, not only competed but clinched first place, an early indication of the legendary status he was destined to achieve in powerlifting.

To do this, he successfully deadlifted 804 lbs, bench pressed 534 lbs and squatted 782 lbs.

Over the next few years, he went on to win national and world powerlifting championships multiple times, while setting some amazing new world records.

But in order to prove that he was the world’s strongest man, he had to advance his reputation in other competitions.

youtube

Strongman

Bill Kazmeier started competing in the World’s Strongest Man championships in 1979, and on his first attempt came 3rd.

This initial setback ignited an unyielding spirit within Kazmaier, propelling him to clinch victory in the subsequent three championships, a testament to his indomitable resolve.

It wasn’t just the fact that he won three times, but he won by completely dominating over his fellow competitors.

The question is, though, how did he achieve this?

Over the next few years, he went on to win national and world powerlifting championships multiple times, while setting some amazing new world records.

But in order to prove that he was the world’s strongest man, he had to advance his reputation in other competitions.

FAQs

Does Bill Kazmaier Still Lift Weights?

Yes, Bill Kazmaier still lifts weights, and most people a third of his age would struggle to keep up. While he doesn’t take part in competitive events and the weights have gone down a lot, he still loves to spend time at the gym.

What Records Did Bill Kazmaier Break?

Bill Kazmaier broke many records, and some of them he kept breaking multiple times. His most notable records were a 914.9 lbs squat, overhead log lift of 375 lbs, 661.4 lbs bench press, and an 886.7 lbs deadlift.

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About The Author

Benedict Ang, CPT, PN1-NC
Staff Writer & Senior Coach
Benedict Ang, CPT, PN1-NC is an ex-National Soccer player turned MMA and Kickboxing champion, with ACE CPT and PN1-NC certifications. His advice is rooted in education and experience, ensuring that readers receive scientific and battle-tested insights. His mission is to empower his clients and readers to realize their potential and become the best versions of themselves.
Learn more about our editorial policy
James Cunningham, BSc, CPT
Staff Writer & Senior Coach
James Cunningham, BSc, CPT holds a BSc degree in Sport & Exercise Science from University of Hertfordshire. He's a Health & Performance Coach from London that brings a unique blend of academic knowledge of health supplements and practical exercise experience to the table for his readers.
Learn more about our editorial policy

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One thought on “Bill Kazmaier Workout Routine and Diet
Training Program Revealed

  1. Bill Kazmaier might have aged now but his bodybuilder body still shows. Amazing!

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