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Does Lifting Weights Make Your Voice Deeper? Find Out Now

Tyler Sellers
Published by Tyler Sellers
Fact checked by Donald Christman, BHSc FACT CHECKED
Last updated: June 1, 2022

Something about a deep voice defines a grown (read - big) man.

Having a deeper voice is typical for movie villains or superheroes, and in most cases, those actors are well-trained, masculine guys.

Since I heard on a few occasions that weight lifting might be one of the secrets to deepening the voice, I decided to conduct a one-month survey with my team. We talked to a lot of people at the gym and read all the literature and sources we could find on the subject.

Here’s what we’ve found out.

Quick Summary

  • Weight lifting stimulates the growth of 'vocal muscles', which may result in some degree of voice deepening.
  • There are some activities that also might contribute, like getting enough sleep and humming exercises.
  • Lower pitched voice is associated with confidence, success, and attractiveness.

Could Lifting Weights Deepen Your Voice?

Grabbing a 10kg dumb bell

The bad news is that, in large part, you're stuck with the voice nature gave you.

Voice depth is determined by your vocal folds’ fixed length and thickness.

These vocal fold traits depend on the amount of testosterone you were hit with during puberty.

But weight lifting may impact your voice transformation in some manner because, besides vocal folds thickness, the depth of your voice is affected by how much air is allowed to resonate.

As you exercise, you are hitting body muscles that control airflow, in the first place, the abs.

The abdominal muscles play a significant role in the control of breathing and are ultimately very important for the voice, which is why singing teachers often emphasize core exercises.

“A strong, balanced core musculature provides exceptional support for your singing technique.” - Claudia Friedlander, voice teacher and fitness trainer, New York City

Together with the abdomen muscles, the diaphragm and strong pectorals have an essential impact on voice pitch. When you breathe properly (from your belly), the total length of your diaphragm pushes the air out.

A strong diaphragm combined with strong pectorals means more efficiently pushed air. That way, you will start to speak from your belly, producing a lower voice pitch.

Weight training also triggers rib cage opening (creates more space between the ribs), which improves lung capacity. That impacts the amount of air that hits vocal folds during speaking, and that added pressure changes the pitch.

A stronger neck may also play a role, as a strong neck is less likely to tighten up during the day, resulting in long vocal folds for a more extended period.

And last but not least, when you regularly workout, more testosterone is produced in the body, which may also lead to a slight modification of your vocal folds.

What Else Could Help You Get There?

Sleeping and drinking water

Other activities may also contribute to voice pitch transformation, and they are mostly deliberate and easy to maintain.

Monotonous Voice

According to some studies, a monotonous speaking voice (without higher notes) is an attractive trait that might affect the number of sex partners for men [1]. A monotonous tone combined with a slower speaking maneuver makes the voice sound more profound.

Enough Sleep

Have you ever wondered why your voice has the lowest pitch in the morning when you wake up? After waking up, your vocal folds are relaxed and elongated. To keep your voice healthy and fresh, you need to get plenty of sleep.

Hydratation

If you get dehydrated, your vocal folds lose thickness and tend to shrink. Thinner vocal folds mean higher pitch. Be sure to drink enough water during the day to maintain your vocal folds’ natural size.

Humming

Humming is a vocal exercise that singers tend to perform before the gig to warm up their singing voice. Humming exercises may lead to relaxed and stretched vocal folds making your pitch lower. It's one of the most common practices in the singing world.

Why Do People Want to Develop a Deep Voice?

Bearded person talking to phone

Most people want to develop a deep voice because it's believed to signify high-testosterone levels.

While this may be the truth, some studies point out that lower-pitched voices make men perceived as masculine, attractive, and respectable [2].

There is some anecdotal evidence that people tend to subconsciously lower their pitch when they want to sound more successful and scholarly.

Also, one study shows that men tend to lower their pitch when talking to potential males [3].

Lowering your voice might even change the effectiveness of influencing others on your path to becoming a leader because it changes how others perceive you [4].

As you exercise, you are hitting body muscles that control airflow, in the first place, the abs.

The abdominal muscles play a significant role in the control of breathing and are ultimately very important for the voice, which is why singing teachers often emphasize core exercises.

“A strong, balanced core musculature provides exceptional support for your singing technique.” - Claudia Friedlander, voice teacher and fitness trainer, New York City

Together with the abdomen muscles, the diaphragm and strong pectorals have an essential impact on voice pitch. When you breathe properly (from your belly), the total length of your diaphragm pushes the air out.

A strong diaphragm combined with strong pectorals means more efficiently pushed air. That way, you will start to speak from your belly, producing a lower voice pitch.

Weight training also triggers rib cage opening (creates more space between the ribs), which improves lung capacity. That impacts the amount of air that hits vocal folds during speaking, and that added pressure changes the pitch.

A stronger neck may also play a role, as a strong neck is less likely to tighten up during the day, resulting in long vocal folds for a more extended period.

And last but not least, when you regularly workout, more testosterone is produced in the body, which may also lead to a slight modification of your vocal folds.

Also Read: Can You Lift Weights Every Day?

FAQs

Does Lifting Weights Affect Singing?

Lifting weights affects singing by shortening and tightening the muscles in the neck and abdomen.

Singers with tighter muscles in the neck, pecs, and shoulders could have vocal problems. Solid neck muscles pressurize laryngeal muscles shortening the range of their movement, leading to problems with singing abilities.

Do Steroids Make Your Voice Deeper?

Steroids (anabolic-androgenic) make your voice deeper by affecting the vocal fold's muscle mass. It's a common irreversible side-effect of anabolic steroid abuse.

The proportion of voice transformation depends on how much steroid is absorbed and the duration of use. It's never advised to use anabolic steroids because of all the possible negative effects on the body.

Does Creatine Lower Your Voice?

No, creatine doesn't lower your voice. There are several potential side effects on your body, but lowering your voice is not one.

Some common creatine side effects might include kidney stones, muscle cramps, bloating, and weight gain.

Is Weightlifting A Good Way to Lower My Voice Pitch?

If you lift weights every day along with a good diet, your testosterone production will rise, which may, in turn, stimulate neck muscles (folds, throat, larynx) growth, ultimately affecting your vocal pitch to some degree.

It will also lead to the development of bigger muscle groups (abs, pecks, shoulders) included in breathing patterns, which impacts vocal folds' intense vibrations.

If you want to increase testosterone production more effectively, I advise you to consider some natural T-boosters that we’ve tried and tested ourselves. They aren’t magic pills, but my clients did experience some great results with some of these after a few months of consistent use.


References:

  1. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10508-010-9625-0
  2. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352250X19301083
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6304053/
  4. https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2016-15301-001

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