Total Shape is a reader-supported site. Purchases made through links may earn a commission. Learn more.

Bryson DeChambeau Workout Routine, Diet Plan & Supplements

Donald Christman
Published by Donald Christman
Fact checked by Donald Christman, BHSc FACT CHECKED
Last updated: May 16, 2022

Bryson DeChambeau is one of the most successful young golfers on the PGA tour, with an amazing track record that extends to the Ryder Cup-winning team as well.

I remember watching him as an amateur at The Masters in 2016 and thinking that he seemed to be creating huge ball speeds.

But that only got faster once he turned pro and started a fitness routine to make him stronger than anyone else on tour.

So, we decided to research dozens of interviews and social media posts to see if we could get to the bottom of what’s involved in Bryson DeChambeau's workout routine.

Bryson Dechambeau Body Stats

  • Born: September 16, 1993
  • Height: 6’1”
  • Weight: 235 lbs

Bryson DeChambeau stormed onto the PGA tour and his golf game dramatically improved when he turned pro and worked on building up targeted muscle mass to give him a more powerful swing speed.

He adjusted his golf swing to the bigger muscle mass and now consistently has the longest driving distance.

“Look, my body fat percentage has maybe gone up a percent or two, but it's not gone up that much at all. I would say a lot of it has been attributed to muscle. It's a lot of muscle.” - Bryson DeChambeau.

Bryson DeChambeau’s Workout Routine

Bryson DeChambeau does a broad mix of compound and isolation exercises, but he’s very careful not to bulk up certain muscle groups that could get in the way of his swing movement and golf game.

Too much muscle is actually bad for golfers.

Monday: Shoulders And Chest

Bearded man doing military push ups

Bryson starts the week with an upper-body muscle workout for maximum swing and ball speed.

  • Lateral raises (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Incline bench presses (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Military push-ups (3 sets of 25 reps)
  • Barbell shrugs (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Front raises (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Cable crossovers (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)

Tuesday: Arms And Back

Showing back muscles, performing chin ups

There’s a bit more focus on isolation exercises in the weight room here as he doesn’t want certain muscles to get too big and in the way of his swinging movement.

  • Preacher curls (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Chin-ups (3 sets of 25 reps)
  • Overhead triceps extensions (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Upright barbell rows (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Deadlifts (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Lying back flys (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)

Wednesday: Legs And Core

Performing side planks

The lower body is just as important for playing golf, and this workout session will target your leg flexion and core.

  • Standing hamstring kickbacks (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Leg Press (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Hamstring curls (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Leg raises (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Side plank (3 sets of 2 minutes)
  • Incline crunches (3 sets of 25 reps)

Thursday: Speed Training

Doing jog sprints outdoor

This day doesn’t involve a single free weight and is mainly about controlling hip rotation movements, trunk flexion, and trunk rotation for speed.

For a lot of this, he’ll make rotating motions with a prime cable machine.

  • Single-arm cross body row (3 sets of 20 reps)
  • Cable punches with rotation (3 sets of 20 reps)
  • Low to high cable rotation (3 sets of 20 reps)
  • Alternating standing upper body rows (3 sets of 20 reps)
  • 100m alternating jog sprints (3 sets of 3 minutes)

Friday: Upper Body And Core

Holding barbell

These are mainly compound movements, and you can vary this day each week to target more muscle groups.

  • Decline bench press (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Triceps rope extensions (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • EZ bar curls (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Lateral raises (3 sets of 12 to 15 reps)
  • Incline crunches (3 sets of 25 reps)
  • Hanging leg raises (3 sets of 25 reps)

Saturday/Sunday: Active Recovery

There’s not a single day that goes by where Bryson doesn’t play a few holes or head to the driving range. This is an important part of his skill training but also contributes to his recovery time as well.

If you don’t golf that much, then go for a few walks or a hike and even consider some swimming to loosen those muscles up a bit.

What Are Bryson DeChambeau’s Workout Principles?

Holding an ez curl bar front view

Bryson DeChambeau’s workout principles are to work as hard as possible in the gym and target very specific muscle groups.

These are predominantly in the arms, back, and core that he needs to create symmetrical strength for his powerful swing.

His training has been heavily influenced by muscle activation techniques (MAT).

This is a technique where physical therapists identify specific muscles that are important but weaker than they should be [1].

Isometric and muscle isolation exercises can then target those muscles either through stretching and yoga or with a cable machine in the weight room.

On some of his training days, he also incorporates bodyweight movements that give him more complete ranges that are similar to a golf swing.

Basically, the more comfortable he is with muscle tension while at full body rotation, the more power he can generate and the less likely it will cause injury [2].

What’s His Diet Plan?

Bryson DeChambeau has a pretty simple diet plan, and he has mentioned in interviews that he’s tried many different approaches, including keto.

What this golf pro also has to keep in mind is that between the time at the gym and on the golf course, he burns a lot of calories every day. That includes walking up to eight miles in a day when he might play two rounds.

To achieve that, he’ll need a lot of carbs and protein.

The carbs will mainly be his fuel for physical activities, and those will come from clean and healthy sources, not cakes and soda [3].

Here’s a sample meal plan.

  • Breakfast: Four-egg omelet with chicken and a bowl of oatmeal with fruit
  • Snack: Green smoothie or protein shakes
  • Lunch: Four chicken breasts with a large portion of vegetables and brown rice
  • Snack: Protein shakes and a cup of unsalted nuts
  • Dinner: 15 ounces of chicken, turkey, or beef with sweet potato and a large bowl of salad
Supplement powder being spread

When you go through a daily workout routine of a professional golfer, then you’ll want to make sure that your body gets everything it needs to perform at such a level.

Here are some supplements that would help with such a workout and allow you to push yourself further than ever before.

Protein Powder

It’s important for athletes to get a large boost of protein after training and throughout the day [4]. With a high-quality whey protein powder, you’ll have a lot more flexibility to get more protein into your diet without having to chew on a chicken breast after you’re finished at the gym.

Pre-Workout

Pre-workouts are an ideal way to get your body to produce more power and feel less fatigued during training. It’s not a magic potion that will give you superhero powers, but it’s enough to add a few more pounds or reps to each set.

Are You Ready To Train Like Bryson DeChambeau?

Whether you’re a complete stranger to a golf course or have set goals to become a professional golfer, the above workout routine will make you stronger for all types of sports.

It’s a tough workout, but sticking with it for several months will add yardage to your drives and allow you to add more force to all your golf shots while feeling less tired at the end of a round.

And to make adding muscle mass a bit easier, I would recommend that you invest in a good pre-workout supplement. These natural products can make every minute at the gym count that much more and get you to your fitness goals a bit faster.


References:

  1. https://muscleactivation.com/muscle-activation/
  2. https://www.golfmonthly.com/videos/golf-swing-tips/how-to-stabilize-your-body-rotation
  3. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6571232/
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6142015/

Was this article helpful?

About The Author